Save the Cassowary campaign launch

Will Meikle (Wildlife Sydney Zoo), Chris Hibbard (Zoos & Aquarium Association) and Jennifer Croes (Rainforest Rescue) Photographer: ©Geof Webb, Rainforest Rescue

Will Meikle (Wildlife Sydney Zoo), Chris Hibbard (Zoos & Aquarium Association) and Jennifer Croes (Rainforest Rescue) Photographer: ©Geof Webb, Rainforest Rescue

Rainforest Rescue held its Save the Cassowary campaign launch at the Sydney Wildlife Zoo in Darling Harbour on Monday 17 March 2014. The campaign aims to raise local, national and international awareness about the plight of the endangered cassowary and to educate the public about its importance in rainforest conservation.

The endangered southern cassowary will be Rainforest Rescue’s 2014 ambassador species and the voice of the rainforest. Rainforest Rescue has initiated the Save the Cassowary campaign in collaboration with the Zoo Aquarium Association and partner zoos, the Queensland Department of Environment Heritage & Protection, local councils, Girringun Aboriginal Corporation and business partners to highlight the plight of the cassowary, our rainforest gardener.

The campaign is closely aligned with the Rainforest Rescue’s expanded activities in the Wet Tropics which include rainforest buy-back, habitat restoration, cassowary population monitoring, community education, and support for the Garners Beach Cassowary Recovery Facility.

Jennifer Croes, Rainforest Rescue’s Conservation Scientist, said ‘Rainforest Rescue has developed a campaign to bridge the conservation gap, working with all our partners but most importantly, the Girringun Aboriginal Corporation, to incorporate Traditional Owners and Indigenous knowledge and values to long-term conservation solutions. Cassowaries play not only a vital role in rainforest biodiversity, but also a significant cultural role in Indigenous traditions.

We are pleased to officially announce that Rainforest Rescue has entered a collaborative partnership with Queensland Government and the Girringun Aboriginal Corporation to manage the Cassowary Rehabilitation Centre at Garners Beach located in Mission Beach, Far North Queensland to care for injured, sick cassowaries and/or orphaned chicks to be released back in the wild where possible’.

Find out how you can support the campaign by visiting savethecassowary.org.au

Rainforest Rescue is an active member of the Cassowary Recovery Team.

Save_The_Cassowary_Logo

New signs for the Cassowary Coast

The Wet Tropics Management Authority has developed some new signs to educate people about cassowaries. Cassowary Coast Regional Council will be putting them up where cassowaries are frequently seen.

WTMA-Cass-Sign-final-artworkWEB

A new sign will also be put up at Coquette Point where cassowaries are often seen on the beach and in the nearby rainforest and swamps. The sign also tells people to look after the little terns and other shorebirds that nest on the dunes and visit the beaches.

Coquette-Point-WEB

New cassowary planning guidelines

New guidelines will help town planners and developers to protect the habitat of the region’s iconic cassowary and mahogany glider.

Cassowary at Coquette PointHabitat corridors connecting sections of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area are very important for the long term survival of cassowaries. Ecological corridors are a vital part of every Council’s new planning scheme. Good planning makes sure that their habitat is conserved and includes ecological corridors for wildlife to move across the landscape.

You can read more in the media release and cassowary guidelines flyer.

You can download the full Cassowaries in Planning Schemes Guideline. 

A totally wild play

The Totally Wild story Three Little Endangered Animals will be going to air on Thursday 15th November 2012 at 3:30pm on Network Ten, Australia. The story features a play about the bilby, the cassowary and the dugong. The play will be travelling to most schools in Queensland. The episode will also be available on line at www.totallywild.com.au.

Many thanks to Deb Pople

After two years of devotion to cassowary conservation, Tablelands tree planting and tramp ant eradication, Deb Pople has decided to leave the Wet Tropics Management Authority and apply her considerable skills and experience in new realms.

Deb has been a driving force behind the Cassowary Recovery Team and established the website from scratch. She will be greatly missed.

All the best Deb, and we hope to still see you around the Wet Tropics!