Cassowaries get their kicks on Lot 66

Opening of Lot 66 Mission Beach (photo Jeff Larson)

Peter Trott, Hon Peter Garrett MP, Leonard Andy, Peter Rowles and Dr Helen Larson celebrate the purchase of Lot 66 (photo Jeff Larson).

Thanks to the efforts on local conservationists at Mission Beach, cassowaries can now enjoy wandering through a 25ha block near Wongaling Beach safe in the knowledge that it is protected as a part of a local wildlife corridor.

The Community for Coastal and Cassowary Conservation (C4) and the Queensland Trust for Nature (QTFN) have worked together to purchase the property known as Lot 66, a popular area of  cassowary  habitat. Together with the adjacent Lot 802 which the local council has designated a wildlife corridor to be managed by the the Djiru Warangburra Aboriginal Corporation, Lot 66 forms part of an important wildlife corridor from the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area to the coast.

Lot 66 will be surveyed, its condition improved  and a suitable house site designated before it is resold as a Nature Refuge.

You can read all the details of how Lot 66 was purchased on the C4 webpage and in the link to the special bulletin about Lot 66.

Senator Peter Garrett at the opening of Lot 66 (photo Jeff Larson)

Hon Peter Garrett MP at the opening of Lot 66 (photo Jeff Larson)

 

How to identify a cassowary

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Ever wondered how to recognise individual cassowaries?

Do you know about different cassowary casques, wattles, skirts, beaks, necks and feet?

Can you identify chicks, juveniles and sub-adults?

Kuranda Conservation has put together a wonderful page full of pictures and hints to help you identify individual cassowaries.

The cassowary identification project aims to record all the cassowaries in the Kuranda region and to follow their movements and behaviour. This includes where they cross roads and where juveniles disperse.

All photos courtesy of Kuranda Conservation.

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Save the Cassowary campaign launch

Will Meikle (Wildlife Sydney Zoo), Chris Hibbard (Zoos & Aquarium Association) and Jennifer Croes (Rainforest Rescue) Photographer: ©Geof Webb, Rainforest Rescue

Will Meikle (Wildlife Sydney Zoo), Chris Hibbard (Zoos & Aquarium Association) and Jennifer Croes (Rainforest Rescue) Photographer: ©Geof Webb, Rainforest Rescue

Rainforest Rescue held its Save the Cassowary campaign launch at the Sydney Wildlife Zoo in Darling Harbour on Monday 17 March 2014. The campaign aims to raise local, national and international awareness about the plight of the endangered cassowary and to educate the public about its importance in rainforest conservation.

The endangered southern cassowary will be Rainforest Rescue’s 2014 ambassador species and the voice of the rainforest. Rainforest Rescue has initiated the Save the Cassowary campaign in collaboration with the Zoo Aquarium Association and partner zoos, the Queensland Department of Environment Heritage & Protection, local councils, Girringun Aboriginal Corporation and business partners to highlight the plight of the cassowary, our rainforest gardener.

The campaign is closely aligned with the Rainforest Rescue’s expanded activities in the Wet Tropics which include rainforest buy-back, habitat restoration, cassowary population monitoring, community education, and support for the Garners Beach Cassowary Recovery Facility.

Jennifer Croes, Rainforest Rescue’s Conservation Scientist, said ‘Rainforest Rescue has developed a campaign to bridge the conservation gap, working with all our partners but most importantly, the Girringun Aboriginal Corporation, to incorporate Traditional Owners and Indigenous knowledge and values to long-term conservation solutions. Cassowaries play not only a vital role in rainforest biodiversity, but also a significant cultural role in Indigenous traditions.

We are pleased to officially announce that Rainforest Rescue has entered a collaborative partnership with Queensland Government and the Girringun Aboriginal Corporation to manage the Cassowary Rehabilitation Centre at Garners Beach located in Mission Beach, Far North Queensland to care for injured, sick cassowaries and/or orphaned chicks to be released back in the wild where possible’.

Find out how you can support the campaign by visiting savethecassowary.org.au

Rainforest Rescue is an active member of the Cassowary Recovery Team.

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Cassowaries in National Geographic

The September 2013 edition of National Geographic has a ‘Big Bird’ story about cassowaries in the Wet Tropics and lots of wonderful photos by Christian Ziegler. You can read the story and see photos and videos on the National Geographic website.

The Cassowary Recovery Team assisted with information and editing for the article and data for the map.

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New cassowary planning guidelines

New guidelines will help town planners and developers to protect the habitat of the region’s iconic cassowary and mahogany glider.

Cassowary at Coquette PointHabitat corridors connecting sections of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area are very important for the long term survival of cassowaries. Ecological corridors are a vital part of every Council’s new planning scheme. Good planning makes sure that their habitat is conserved and includes ecological corridors for wildlife to move across the landscape.

You can read more in the media release and cassowary guidelines flyer.

You can download the full Cassowaries in Planning Schemes Guideline. 

Cassowary Sightings Log

Cassowary Sightings from the Cassowary Coast 1999-2012

For many years, CRT member C4 have been collecting sightings information about cassowaries through a daily log at their Visitor Centre in Mission Beach.

When local retiree, Jeff Larson (a self-confessed “mad stats” person), joined C4 in 2009, he generously volunteered his time to enter all the data into a spreadsheet for public viewing. Continue reading

Zoo and Aquarium Association Cassowary Husbandry Workshop

The Zoo and Aquarium Association hosted a cassowary husbandry workshop on 3-4 August 2011 to update the Cassowary Husbandry Manual (Romer Ed. 1997) with the latest information about all aspects of the captive management of the Southern Cassowary. The primary aim of the document will be to update and improve captive cassowary husbandry and management across the board, and it will be freely shared with all establishments housing Southern Cassowaries, and with those who work with, or would like to work with, the species.  Continue reading